Tigress Nancy Ndeke brews yet another fresh-mix concoction of poetry , credo and reason.


The reader will find many questions and few answers, and that is because life is a constant quest. The reader is then afforded a chance to think, and in doing so, possibly empower the self to a better human. Topics range from why divisions exist between races, to the vagaries of injustices as recorded by history. The great theme of being in mortal man ruling kin with the hands of self-appointed god-head raises the question of morality and truth as presented by those with an agenda other that general good to all. Love, whether for fellow man, Country of deity are themes that preoccupy many a poem. The motif of the Bridge which this book borrows so generously from, is symbol of the interconnectedness all there is in our world. From past eternity, through history and movement of people to belief systems that pit one group against another. The book asks for the reader to engage his/her mind in a renewed manner. There is hope for humanity even at the worst of times. Nancy Ndeke is an avid reader who writes as much. Nancy draws her writings from both observed living and personal experiences. She is a child of nature by the fate of birth having been born and bred in a rural setting before climate change vagaries became a reality. Through school and travel, her eyes experienced the wholeness of the other enriching her further. Her work experience in was ravaged countries further brought to her the sad reality and tragedy of wars-( Blurb by NANCY NDEKE)

True North, with Canadian Poets and Storytellers


Before social media, it would've taken twelve lifetimes to meet the writers, activists and peace-makers who've come into my life. That is as true for this unexpected collaboration with Mbizo Chirasha and Time of the Poet Republic, as for the Canadian poets and storytellers who responded for this very special issue. Even if we weren't featuring themes of Tolerance and Peace-building, it would still be necessary for this collection to feature writers as varied as this country itself. And so, I went everywhere I could, asking Indigenous, People of Colour and writers from our vibrant LGBTQ2+ community for their words. Soon, the poetry, followed by prose, began to arrive, from the West to the East coast, and the cold far North. Our first offering came from Calgary, Alberta poet Lori D. Roadhouse Haney, and it was immediately clear, within a single line of verse, that this issue had the potential to be bring us to our knees with grace. Juan Ramirez, meanwhile, calls all who will listen to participate in a social re-Genesis, while Dew Williams brings us into the realities of her Indigenous-Canadian life, through the simple act of drawing her teacher a picture, and then drawing it again. And again. Our youngest storyteller, nine year old Raelynn, carries with her the hope that our next generation is already as gifted and inclusive as anyone who's been spilling ink for decades. Hers is a talent that needs to be supported in the literary arts, and we're proud to do that here. We have a sonnet. We have a poem about the human mathematics of war. The Poet Laureate of the Yukon has graced us with two selections, while yet more poets of note than I can mention, including first-time authors, award winners and a contributor with 17 books to his name, have poured out their pens to speak peace and love and heartbreak to a listening world. I have no diplomatic status, but I have nonetheless anointed one honourary Canadian in the person of Iraqui-American, Pulitzer Prize nominated, Pushcart Prize winning poet, Faleeha Hassan. Although she's made America her home, Faleeha embodies the deepest, best, shared belief of our two countries: that an immigrant is as Canadian, is as American, as anyone whose great-great-grandparents were born here. With that belief in contention in the nation she's adopted, we welcome her into this collection with gratitude and love. Then...then there's Patrick Friesen Patrick (of no known relation to myself) is a Mennonite writer who needs no introduction to Canadian writers and readers. A pioneer of writing about the culture and religious tradition into which he and I were born, a generation apart, this poet has been shortlisted for our country's highest literary honour, while clearing a path for writers like me to speak truth into and outside of our communities. If you missed it at the top of this page, scroll back before reading on. Turn on your sound and hear the voice of the poet himself. In this graciously-given video, Friesen's words are punctuated and amplified through the extraordinary musicality and production of his son Niko Friesen. We couldn't be more proud and grateful to them both for allowing us to present this gift to you. Dear readers: Thank you for spending the following time with us in Canada. In choosing the order of works, I tried to tell a story. Sincerely, Darcie Friesen Hossack